Category: GAJET Events

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Congratulations to our Halloween Costume Contest winners, as chosen by the people! Our Round One event was a blast and we hope to see you all again next Halloween! Thanks to all who came out and participated in the contest.

Drum roll please! The winners are…

Cutest Costume – Valerie

The most adorable sunflower ever!

Scariest Costume – Chris

Giving us chills as a Resident Evil monk.

Most Creative Costume – Christopher

Chris killed it as a low-budget Sub Zero!

Best Couple/Group Costume – Kei and Sylvia

We were wowed by this Nier: Automata pair!

Best Overall Costume – TIED between Austin and Forrest

If you didn’t get a chance to enter in the costume contest, have no fear because GAJET’s 2019 Fall Photo Contest is starting now!

The theme this year is “Changes” – whether it’s the autumn leaves, the earlier sunsets, the changes you’ve seen if you arrived this summer, or the changes you’re appreciating as recontracting season approaches. 👀

Get your cameras ready to capture those 🎶ch-ch-changes🎶 – they pass by as quickly as the leaves!

Please send all your submissions to [email protected] with the subject “Fall Photo Contest” by Saturday, November 30th! Please include your full name and a caption, and remember that the photo must be taken in glorious Gunma! 🐴

The winner will receive a ¥2000 Amazon gift card, and have their photo featured as the cover on our Facebook group and website, gunmajet.net. The winner will be chosen by vote on Facebook. 🌟 Good luck on your photo adventures!

Gallery: Canyons 2019

October 11, 2019 | GAJET Events, Gallery, JET Life | No Comments

As expected, our annual trip to Canyons provided full-throttle action, with the pictures to prove it!

Along with the Canyons shenanigans, we had a successful summit of Mount Tanigawadake.

Don’t worry if you were a bit scared. Just dab on the haters!

See you next year!

“Getting to the top is optional. Getting down is mandatory.” — Ed Viesturs

This crucial lesson was learned by our group of fifteen fearless climbers as we all made our best attempt to conquer Mount Fuji in a revitalized GAJET event, spearheaded by Valerie and Alex. Thinking back on those two long August days, we’ve made a collection of thoughts on the highs on lows. Read on to get an insider’s look into the trials and tribulations of Fuji-san!

Our intrepid crew, ready to head off from the fifth station. Photo credit: Jasmine Jenkins

 

Why did you want to climb Mount Fuji?

Devyn: It’s been my dream to climb Mt. Fuji (shrine to summit, along one of the old pilgrimage routes) since I read about it as a kid. It’s one of the things that got me really interested in Japan. Since I have arthritis in a bunch of my joints, and my mobility is likely to decrease with time…well, no time like the present, eh? Plus, GAJET organizing the event meant I had the opportunity to climb with many friends. 😀

Nate: I like hiking and climbing mountains.

Rachelle: I wanted to climb Mt. Fuji to challenge my mind and body’s perceived limits.

Valerie: The people asked for the return of the GAJET Fuji Hike, so we listened!

Jasmine: It had been on my Japan bucket list for a few years now. I always enjoyed looking at Mt. Fuji from afar, but I thought climbing it would be a memorable experience as well.

Valerie leads the charge on the ascent. Photo Credit: Noa Abbey

What kind of experience did you have before attempting the hike?

Jasmine: None whatsoever!

Valerie: Just novice hiking. I had climbed Haruna, Myogi, Arafune, and Kurofuyama, as well as other trails and hikes here and there.

Nate: I rock climb and hike a lot, but this was the most difficult hike I’ve done.

Devyn: I’m a moderately experienced hiker, having hiked stateside and in other parts of Japan and Southeast Asia. This is the tallest mountain I’ve ever climbed, though.

Devyn and Alex take in the scene. Photo credit: Junie Chin

What was the most difficult part of the trip?

Valerie: Difficulty breathing at higher altitudes and hiking in the dark.

Ciara: The most difficult part was the final run between the ninth station and the top; the feeling that I was so close but also still so far.

Nate: I didn’t prepare well enough for how cold it would be at the top, and coming down was awful because I had no water and unlike going up there were no opportunities to buy more.

Rachelle: The most difficult part was going down the mountain on loose gravel. My whole body was screaming at me to quit but obviously that wasn’t an option.

Devyn: Descending was brutal, which most people don’t seem to mention in articles about climbing Fuji-san (probably with good reason). It might be TMI, but several of my toenails are still black from it.

Views from our mountain hut! Photo credit: Junie Chin

What was your favorite part?

Jasmine: Getting to the bottom lol

Nate: The sunrise. I started crying a bit. I felt weird for tearing up at the top but it felt really oddly profound and beautiful.

Ciara: The moment I began descending the mountain, the feeling that I was going home.

Devyn: Seeing the remnants of huts and signs explaining what used to stand there in the past along the lower portions of the trail; seeing the sun rise above the sea of clouds and reaching the summit; making unforgettable memories with some of my best friends here.

Valerie: I actually enjoyed scrambling up/over rocks. And the descent was great; it was warm and bright out.

Rachelle: Reaching the top with one of my favorite people; being able to look at them and say, ‘We did it!’

The line to the top. Hiking Fuji during Obon is no joke! Photo credit: Jasmine Jenkins

Any funny or weird moments?

Ciara: When we reached the sixth station, and it dawned on us that it was almost all over, we ran to the fifth station. Where did all that energy come from?

Rachelle: None of the hand warmers we brought worked. Not a single one! It was an ice cold wait for the sunrise.

Devyn: Funny: Realizing that the Yoshida Trail 5th station and the place where the buses drop everyone off are two different 5th Stations (about 2 km apart) is hilarious in retrospect. Also, being warned by the owner of the bar beneath our hostel that I would: see no one along the trail until 5th station; likely get lost; and possibly be mauled by a bear—only to run into 50+ other hikers/trail runners/a group of scouts on a hiking trip on my way up to 5th station. (**Being aware of one’s surroundings while hiking and/or hiking with a buddy is important. The advice was appreciated, but likely more useful to people climbing outside of the high season.**) Weird: Thought it was real strange that I had cell service at the top! But it was cool to text people back home from the highest place in the country!

Valerie: Everyone laughed at me for bringing my Chromebook up Fuji, but I had to get work done for Gunma Orientation, and I was determined to have my cake and eat it too! The best part is that you can actually get service on Fuji, so I was able to hotspot from my phone and upload my files from the seventh station! 🤣🤣🤣 On the descent, at one point I was so sleepy I told my hiking partner that I had to stop to rest. We laid down on our backpacks on the gravelly red lava rock in the morning sun, and it was one of the best naps I’ve ever had.

That sunrise makes it all worth it! Photo credit: Valerie Landers

Tell us about something especially interesting or memorable that you noticed.

Valerie: We saw fireworks happening below in one of the towns! From that altitude they looked so small! It was wild to see them from above like that.

Ciara: I was the dirtiest I’ve ever been in my life when I returned to the fifth station.

Jasmine: I forgot what station it was, but one of the walking stick stampers engaged us in conversation and gave us a present. He was so kind!

Rachelle: Being so high above the clouds was thrilling, humbling, and beautiful. Yet, there was a hint of unease because some part of me felt there was no reason for a person to be up that high. I would do it again for the view though. That Mt. Fuji sunrise was something magical!

Above the clouds and on top of the world! Photo credit: Jasmine Jenkins

Do you have any advice for future Fuji hikers?

Ciara: Don’t do it, and if you do, buy a Fuji stick. And bring wet wipes!

Nate: Pack enough food and water for the climb down because there are no rest stops!

Rachelle: Read the advice forums and bring proper gear. Respect the fact that while Mt. Fuji is a tourist attraction it’s still a mountain and hiking it comes with risks. Be careful and have fun!

Jasmine: Please prepare for the cold at the top of the mountain! Bring gloves, hand warmers, a few layers of socks, etc. Also, I highly recommend getting a walking stick. It helped me out so much.

Valerie: Listen to your body if you aren’t feeling well or need to rest. If you can’t make it to the summit as happened to a few of us, it’s ok! The sunrise will still be beautiful, and you can try again another time, better prepared (as I hope to do next year!).

Devyn: BRING POLES AND A HEADLAMP. You’ll be glad to have them. Keep moving during the pre-dawn hours, otherwise you’ll freeze. Have fun and be safe! You’ll never forget this adventure!

Gallery: I Can Japan 2019

May 27, 2019 | GAJET Events, Gallery, JET Life | No Comments

The GAJET community gathered in Maebashi this past Saturday for the eighth annual I Can Japan charity event. ALTs and locals alike gathered for an evening of great food, performances, and prizes. All the money raised at this event is given to the Komochiyama foster home in Shibukawa, Gunma.

We hope to see you all next year. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event. Thanks to Jansen Magarro and Gavin Au-Yeung for taking pictures.

Making Rays of Sunshine

April 25, 2019 | Blog, GAJET Events, JET Life | No Comments

Last weekend, members of GAJET had an opportunity to give back to the community by spending a playful afternoon at the Komochiyama Foster Home in Shibukawa. The brief visit is an early indicator for GAJET’s annual I Can Japan event, being held this year on May 25.

I Can Japan began as an endeavor to support the communities affected by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Borrowing the kanji characters for love (愛, ‘ai’) and feelings (感, ‘kan’), I Can Japan 2019 will mark the third year of GAJET supporting Komochiyama’s cause; 100% of the proceeds raised will be donated to the foster home. Your contributions will help provide invaluable resources for the children living there.

Komochiyama is home to more than 50 children ranging from infants to teenagers. The home provides a safe, supportive, and engaging environment for these growing children.

During the visit, GAJET members took part in many fun activities with the children. The afternoon started off with self-introductions from the kids, staff, and GAJET members. After we got to know each other, we began the fun activities outside.

The first game we played was a hybrid of Simon Says and Red Light, Green Light. The goal of the game was to listen carefully and move forward only when ‘Simon says’. The kids caught on quick and it became an intense race to the finish line. The children had a great time taking large leaps towards the goal, while GAJET members struggled to keep their balance.

Afterwards, the group played Capture the Bacon. This game involved arranging the kids in numbered groups based on their size. When a number gets called out, the corresponding group would race towards the ‘bacon’ (in this case, a small bag), the first person to pick it up is the winner. This was initially confusing for some of the younger kids. It was hilarious to see some of them charging at the ‘bacon’ at every chance they got – regardless of which number was called out.

Finally, we played a fierce game of Duck-Duck-Goose. Racing around the circle of people with a 5 year old chasing after you was a challenge. It was actually quite defeating to be tagged by a kid a quarter of your size. Once tagged you would be forced to sit in the middle of the circle, and become the ‘duck soup.’ While in the circle, the slurping sounds and tiny chomping jaws begin. Some of the kids would say you are delicious while others would show disgust. The children had no restraint in telling us what they thought.

To cool down after all the excitement, we ventured back inside to make paper suns for I Can Japan. Be sure to come out on May 25 to see their beautiful creations. Suns, faces, and cartoon characters were only some of the pieces of art that were made.

Four o’clock had come and we had to say our goodbyes. Hugs and head pats were a plenty, and some kids held on to us a little longer than others. I found myself surrounded by the children, ripping off their nametags and slapping them onto my jacket.

This afternoon served as a reminder that we are easily caught up in our lives; losing sight of what is happening around the community. We are truly fortunate to be ALTs in Gunma. The time we spent at the foster home showed us that children are able to enjoy their lives despite their unfortunate experiences. It showed us the strength of these children. Furthermore, the workers at Komochiyama deserve recognition for maintaining a safe, clean and healthy place for these kids to grow. We were able to witness the love, compassion and kindness they have for these children.

It is from this strong sense of community that we can move forward and proudly say “I Can!”


Jansen Magarro is a fourth year JET in Tatebayashi. He is on this year’s GAJET committee as the Tobu representative. Come out and say “hi” to him at I Can Japan.