Five Takeaways from the 2019 After JET Conference

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This year’s After JET Conference was held on February 28 at the Tokyo Bay Makuhari Hall in Chiba. Hosted by CLAIR, the conference provides information and support for leaving JETs. The AJC was followed by the JET Programme Career Fair which hosted upward of 100 companies who aimed to speak with leaving JETs about a possibility of further employment in Japan.

Here are my thoughts after the two-day event.


1. Be a Dragon

The AJC was kicked off with an amazing keynote speech by former Hida Takayama JET, Ryan Paugh. In his memorable speech, he made a distinction between two kinds of job-seekers: the butterfly and the dragon. Butterflies commonly send out a few job applications, but their search – for the most part – is passive. Dragons, on the other hand, take a forward approach to job hunting; utilizing their networks and actively making sure that others know they are on the hunt for a job.

Delivery of the keynote speech, by Ryan Paugh

2. Build a strong LinkedIn Profile 

With the ever-increasing importance of social networking, its safe to assume that possible-employers will be Googling your name when your application lands on their desk. Take advantage of this by creating a strong LinkedIn profile. According to Paugh, who previously worked at the social networking company, more than 50 per cent of employers judge a profile based on (1) your photo and (2) your headline. Make your display picture clean and professional, and your headline attention-grabbing.

And of course, make sure you delete that drunk selfie you posted online last weekend.

3. Tell your JET experience (on your resume)

Your working experience as an ALT might not seem to relate with your desired career in marketing, accounting, or even chemistry; but rest assured the year(s) spent in Japan have equipped you with tangible skills for your next career move.

Even the action of stepping foot and working in Japan proves you are resilient, adaptable, and a great team player. Teaching English in front of hundreds of kids – great for public speaking. Making a lesson plan or year-long curriculum – a great example of organization and leadership qualities.

Don’t sell yourself short. The JET Programme provides us with so many soft skills, applicable to any workplace.

4. The world is full of JETs 

Continuing with LinkedIn, make sure to connect with JET Alumni groups worldwide and back home as there are tons of experts who could be working in a field you are interested in. Send them a quick message asking for a bit of their time. Schedule a meeting and pick the minds of our global senpai community. I don’t need to convince you that the JET community is always willing to help a fellow member out.

5. Jobs in Japan for foreigners are plenty, but…

…make sure you know your limitations. This was made very clear on the second day Career Fair, as many companies required business level Japanese abilities. In fact, the three morning lectures on the day of the career Fair were entirely in Japanese. To our fellow JETs sporting N1 or N2, the world (or Japan) is your oyster. Companies like Nintendo and even the famous (among JETs) Keio Plaza Hotel will gladly open their arms for you.

All three of the second day’s lecture were in Japanese.

Not to say that anyone with N3 or below should despair. There will always be work available for you. Your time on the JET Programme proves you are capable workers. However, keep in mind the restrictions of language; be realistic about your career goals in Japan. Most people who aren’t strong in Japanese will most likely find their next job in Japan in English teaching or recruiting. Of course, larger cosmopolitan cities like Tokyo will have more (English speaking) opportunities.


These were some of my takeaways from the two conferences this year. Let me know what you think, and feel free to add your own ideas in the comments below!

Originally from Canada, Gavin Au-Yeung is a second-year SHS JET in Isesaki. He is currently preparing for his departure from the JET Programme, but is trying his best to enjoy the remaining months. 

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