Category: Guides

Home / Category: Guides

Overcoming the Desk Warming Blues

July 23, 2018 | Blog, Guides, Japan life | No Comments

While classes may have stopped during the summer vacation, JETs are still required to go to work. Of course, many of us will use vacation days during this time.

On the other hand, there are also many JETs who will find themselves confined to their desks during this time. It doesn’t matter if you’re entering your fifth year on JET or if you just got off the plane, desk warming can be one of the most boring things about the job.

The summer stretch at your desk may feel like an eternity, but let’s talk about some ways you can make the days go by faster.

With the right attitude, your desk warming days can feel like a breeze 😉

1: Explore your school: 

New JETs. You’ve just be thrown into a new environment, and you probably have a lot of questions about your new school. Important questions like, “where is the toilet?” can be easily answered by wandering through hallways. While your school campus may initially look like a maze, summer vacation will give you a good chance to freely explore the building.

Additionally, you can also organize your desk. This will be your workspace for the year, so roll up your sleeves and get cleaning. Maybe your predecessor left you a lot of useful materials (read: junk). Figure out what you need and what can be thrown out.

 

2: Prepare lessons:

New JETs will most likely be expected to prepare an introductory lesson about themselves and their home country. Use this time to plan what you will do with this lesson – a fun quiz or a PowerPoint presentation full of pictures are sure to be successful. You haven’t actually met your students yet, so don’t worry too much about lesson planning. Use the first few weeks of classes to gauge their abilities.

For continuing JETS, definitely use this time to plan ahead. The best case scenario is planning for the entire upcoming school term. At the same time, remember that schedules can abruptly change.

For those of you lucky enough to have a designated English classroom, take some time to rearrange desks and decorate the room before your students arrive.

 

3: Learn something:

Most of us will have Internet access on our workplace computers. However, every good website (i.e. YouTube) is likely to be blocked. Fortunately, there are still other things you can do online. Use this free period of time to study something you have always wanted to learn. Perhaps you’ve always been interested in picking up photography; well here’s your chance! There are many free online resources which can help you learn new skills or explore new hobbies; just be sure not to disturb your co-workers. If you’re lost for ideas, studying Japanese is always a safe bet!

Alternatively, you can always bring a good book or e-reader.

 

4: Visit clubs:

Although classes are halted during summer vacation, many junior and senior high school students still spend their summer days at school. Club activities, especially sports, are practiced religiously in Japan. Many clubs may try to take advantage of the prolonged break from classes to practice every day. If possible, try to talk with club supervisors to see if you can watch or participate in club activities. Furthermore, interacting with your students outside of class is a great way to build rapport.

 

5: Plan your next trip:

You may be trapped at your desk now, but at least you still have weekends off! If you’re new to Gunma, definitely check out some local spots. There are tons to explore in our own backyard, so get pumped and get planning.

Start making that bucket list!

 

6: Write for GAJET:

Every Situation Is Different. 

A phrase we’ve heard countless times, and a phrase which continues to hold truth. Each of us are bound to have our own unique stories and experiences. Why not use the summer vacation to write down some of your thoughts. GAJET is always looking for new content so please get in touch with us!

 

7: Enjoy it while you can:

You may be bored out of your mind now. But remember, summer vacation will come to an end. Relax and have some tea. Maybe eat out for lunch. Enjoy these tranquil times, because your overly-genki students will be bombarding you soon enough!


Have other ideas? Leave a comment below!

Gavin Au-Yeung is entering his second year as a senior high school JET in Isesaki. He will be celebrating his one-year anniversary with the JET Programme by desk warming. 

So you need to get a background check, huh?

Maybe you’re moving out of the country, or maybe you just want a change of pace here when your contract is up, but either way, this is the place you need to go:

群馬県警察鑑識科学センター

〒371-0846 Gunma-ken, Maebashi-shi, Motosōjamachi, 535−1

 

They’re open from 8:30 to 5.

It’s 1.4 km from Shim-Maebashi station, so you might want to take a cab. If not, there’s an underground walkway, but it’s kinda hard to get to from the station. Go straight out the main exit, turn right at the main street there (just past the restaurants and all that) and walk for quite a ways. When you get to where the karaoke place is just across the street from you, you can turn right and head into the underground area. This leads almost straight to the place, but I wouldn’t experiment with the route if you’re in a hurry. Honestly, from the outside, it doesn’t look like it’s going to take you anywhere other than an old warehouse in which to be murdered.

Once you make it there, you can talk to the receptionist. She doesn’t speak English, but she’ll call over a guy who will muddle through it with you. If you both do Japanglish, you can get the job done. He’s a jolly little guy with glasses.

Here’s the thing: the guy who does the fingerprints is very skilled with his machine. He will make some odd, “I don’t know about this” grunts as he does the job, but if you’re only after a Japanese background check, you’re gonna be fine. They have a form that has English on it, as well as a sample, pre-filled one for you to crib off of. It takes about ten minutes all told, you pay them, and then you’re done for the day. You will have to come back a week or so later to pick up your results (they can’t mail it, he says), but that’ll be that.

If you need an FBI background check, however… Well. That’s more interesting. I brought the FBI’s fingerprinting card that I printed out from their site.

https://www.fbi.gov/file-repository/standard-fingerprint-form-fd-258-1.pdf/view

No, they don’t have copies of this card on site. Yes, you should bring your own. Yes, printing on regular old combini printer paper is just fine. No, it doesn’t need to be on cardstock. My suggestion: fill out the information at the top BEFORE you make copies of the form. (I checked with the pertinent authorities and the writing on the form doesn’t need to be fresh, just the prints.) The fingerprinting guy made a couple copies of my form for my own personal use after I got there because, well, I think he knew how it was going to go. (Hint: not well.)

If you’re in this predicament and not well-versed in fingerprinting, go on YouTube and learn how to take fingerprints. No, I am not joking. No, I am not exaggerating. Luckily, I’ve been fingerprinted rather often for my previous employers, so I knew what I was doing. The “fingerprint technician” did not. At all. After we collaborated in ruining two of my FBI printouts, I delegated to him the job of holding the paper still. I did the rest—rolling the ink, taking the impressions, and checking my work. Some key notes for you:

1) Get your whole finger print inked—go high enough up (practically to the top of your finger), and roll your finger left or right until you basically hit your nail on both sides. Get full coverage here.

2) If you were a little messy inking yourself, make sure you wipe off your finger below the first knuckle crease. I ruined one page because I was sloppy in the inking process.

3) Have him hold the paper so that the box you intend to fill is at the edge of the table. If it is, your other fingers will be out of the way (i.e., off the table) and it will be easier to roll them.

4) Test the mechanics of your hand before you put your finger down. Then, press your finger down and roll the way that your hand wants to roll. The left hand is generally easier to roll from left to right, the right hand is the opposite for me. Your hands may be different, though.

5) Use your opposite hand to apply pressure to the finger that you’re rolling. Generally, this means using your thumb and forefinger on the helper hand applied, essentially, to the nailbed area.

6) Don’t press too hard or you’ll just make a black smudge instead of a print.

7) Check the FBI guidelines on the printout—they tell you what’s good enough, so make sure you’re not making any obvious mistakes. If you did, start over.

8) Wipe off after each roll. The last thing you want is a stray print muddying up a good impression.

When you’re finished, they’ll want to make a copy for their own records. I’m not sure why, but it’s a thing they do. Lastly, there’s a spot on the paper for them to sign, but “Japanese police don’t sign things,” so they won’t be doing that, either. Honestly, if you’re after the FBI background check, you’re going to this place to make use of their stamp pad and that’s about it. Your experience may be different, but for me, it was a complete farce.

After you’re done with all of that, you’ll need to pay them. That means going to a driving school that’s outside, across the little river there, and giving them 400 yen for a stamp. Bring the stamp back, and they’ll finalize your Japanese background check. From here, you’ll wait a week or so for your Japanese results. Meanwhile, you’ll need to go and mail off your fingerprints to the FBI. I’m not including the address here in case something changes in the near (or far) future. You can easily find it on the internet.

Good luck, and my your fingers be flexible enough to face the twists and turns of a struggling middle-aged Japanese man.

************

Quick note about the FBI: they take forever. You can go through an FBI channeler, a service that will greatly expedite the process, but you should know that they don’t accept documents that aren’t signed by the place that did your prints, and they’re going to want to send your results to an address within the United States. (This was my experience, anyway—maybe you’ll find someone more lenient who’s willing to deal with the cultural differences. Truthfully, the FBI doesn’t care if that spot is signed or not, according to the research I did online, but the channelers have their own rules.) This is a problem, obviously, but I’m pretty sure nobody’s going to check if someone named Tanaka works at the Maebashi police station, if you catch my drift.

(Disclaimer: What you do with that line on the form is entirely your choice, please don’t consider this to be bulletproof or consequence free advice from a wizened older JET. You do you, and please don’t implicate me, GAJET or the JET Program if you get in trouble for what you do when you do you.)

Final Note: There are places in Tokyo that will do your FBI fingerprints and sign the document. They will charge you 20,000 yen for their services, though, so honestly, I didn’t even entertain the thought.

50cc Life: Get Your Scooter License in Gunma

September 7, 2017 | Blog, Guides | 2 Comments

If you’re new to Japan and have been asking around about how to get a Japanese driver’s license, you’ve probably heard some tales. There are some determined ALTs out there. Shrugging off the expenses and stress, they take the driving skills test over and over again until they finally pass.

If you’re looking for another way, a 50cc scooter license might be right up your alley. Getting one is actually very simple. No need to take a driving skills test. No struggling through a Japanese paper test.  Here you’ll find information on obtaining a scooter license the simple and easy way.

image1

Step 1
Translate your home country’s license to Japanese at JAF (the Japan Automobile Federation)

First, check that you meet the following requirements: (1) you must have lived in Japan for at least three months. (2) your foreign license is not expired.

Documents to bring to the JAF office:

  1. Application form, direct from the JAF website.  外国運転免許証翻訳文発行申請書
  2. Your driver’s license from your home country. 外国運転免許2
  3. Photocopy of your residence card. (Also, bring your card just in case). 在留カード3
  4. 3,000

How to:

  • Prepare the required documents.
  • Check the location for your nearest JAF office.image2
  • Go there. You don’t need an appointment, but check their hours of operation beforehand.
  • Talk to an agent and submit necessary documents.
  • Receive the translation. Keep it in a safe place until you go to the Traffic Center.

For more information, check out Information on the Japanese Translation for Switch a Foreign Driver’s License to a Japanese License.

Step 2
Prepare Your Documents and Study for the 10 question English Driving Test

According to section 3 of the local Traffic Center’s Procedure for Obtaining a Japanese Driver’s License document, you must bring the following documents to the Prefectural Driving Center. You may need to go to City Hall to collect one or more of these.

(3) a. Your original driver’s license + a copy of both the front and back
(3) b. The Japanese translation of your license from JAF
外国運転免許証翻訳文4
(3) c. Your passport + copies of most of its pages
(3) d. Your resident card and certificate of residence
住民票5 + a copy of each

The Certificate of Residence is different from the document you initially received in City Hall. Take the attached original document with the Japanese to City Hall to make it very clear which document you’re requesting.

(3) e. Written application (the clerk will produce and may fill out on your behalf) + your 3 x 2.4 cm photograph.

Photo booths are often located outside large chain stores or train stations. The Traffic Center also has a photo booth handy. No, these are not the fun purikura kind where you can add a mustache and place a ghost in the background!

(3)f. Bring your international driver’s license (if you have one) just in case.

If you are from a non-Western country, you may need more documentation (when I was waiting, I heard the Japanese clerk tell a Sri Lankan man that he needed additional papers)

To prepare for the 10 question English driving test, get to know Japanese road signs and regulations. Learn the 3-point turn that is specific to driving a 50cc scooter. Also, drive with friends and chat about driving with coworkers or other ALTs who have been driving in Japan for a while.


Step 3
Getting your Japanese Driver’s License at the Prefectural Traffic Center

Check the location and hours of Gunma Prefecture’s Traffic Center 総合交通センター6. It’s a ten minute walk from Shin-Maebashi Station. Bring more than enough cash to cover the fees (these total around 1 man yen 一万円).

Go to the Traffic Center right when they open because it will already be busy. In 2012, the hours were 1:00-4:30pm Monday to Friday. Expect to be at the Traffic Center until after 4:00pm. Expect to wait between the various steps and bring something to fill your time.

Follow the yellow line to the second floor. Stand in line for Foreign License Conversion (this was on the far right). Wait until it is your turn and, in Japanese, tell them you want a 50cc scooter license and that you aren’t going to take the driving skill test運転技術試験7 .

Provide your documents. They will check them, ask you clarifying questions, and maybe request more copies. If they need a copy of something, they will send you to the copier down the hall. (Interesting note, they asked me about the age restriction printed on my Wisconsin driver’s license. I told them it was to make it clear to clerks that I couldn’t buy alcohol and that it had nothing to do with driving.)

Take the vision test. When they’re ready, the clerk will direct you to the back of the reception area to complete an eyesight test視力検査8. You will be asked to look at circles and tell the vision specialist which direction the gap in each circle is facing. Make sure you know the Japanese for “up” “down” “right” and “left.” Then, you will need to identify colors. Be ready with your Japanese color words! Then, the vision specialist will sign your papers, and you will take them back to the reception counter at the front of the room. There you will pay for the vision test. Wait as they complete your paperwork and process the other foreigners in line.

Take the 50cc scooter 10 question paper test in English or Portuguese/Spanish. When called, follow the clerk to a nearby room. Each question of the test is accompanied by a descriptive picture, likely because the English is wordy. At the end of the test, the clerk collects your test and grades it. You’ll know right then and there if you passed.

Pay for the test at another counter. You will then be asked to enter two four digit numbers into a machine, which will print a paper you will need for the next step. Again, there may be a long wait at this time. Take out something to do, but pay attention to what’s going on.

Get your driving license photo taken. Finally, go with the other people who have passed the test to have your photo taken. After your license is printed, your name will be called, the clerk will ask you to check the spelling of your name and your address, and then you’re free to go– Japanese 50 cc scooter license in hand!


Step Four
Buying Your Scooter & Gear

You’ll Need:

  • Scooter
  • Mandatory vehicle liability insurance自賠責保険9
  • Helmet
  • Gloves
  • Windproof/waterproof coat

If you want to buy a used scooter and an ALT near you isn’t selling one, find a used motorbike shop (usually you can find these near a university). I bought my scooter from Tsukagoshi Motors塚越モーター near 高崎市経済大学校Takasaki Keizai Daigakko at 744-1 Kaminamiemachi, Takasaki 370-0801. Used scooters sell for between 50,000 -80,000 yen.

Shiny new scooters sell at any motorbike store. These are usually located on main roads and easy to identify because bikes and scooters are displayed in the windows. These run 170,000-200,000 yen.

For accessories and gear, go to a specialty shop. Takasaki’s Ricoland ライコランド高崎店image4

stocks helmets, gloves, and jackets. I recommend getting a helmet that shields your face. Bugs are real. Rain will also happen.

You’ll need insurance before you start driving. I asked the owner of the shop where I bought my scooter for a recommendation. He suggested an insurance company in downtown Takasaki called Zenrosai共済ショップ高崎店.image5

Insurance can run near 30,000 yen annually and may involve authorizing an auto-withdrawal from your bank account.

Stay Safe

Remember to keep in the left lane and do 3-point turns at intersections which are wider than 2 lanes (one way). Keep track of your mileage and when you’ll need an oil change. Know your route before departing, be aware of traffic, and try to keep at a reasonable speed.

Don’t hold a phone and don’t drive in the rain. Be safe. If you think you’ve missed your turn or it starts raining, just pull over, shut off your bike, check Google maps or wait out the downpour, and return to the road when conditions are right.

Good luck!

This guide was compiled by a former JET who completed this process in 2013. If you notice any errors or feel you have any important information to add, please contact the GAJET Editor, [email protected]

Glossary

1. 外国運転免許証翻訳文発行申請書(がいこくうんてんめんきょしょうほんやくぶんはっこうしんせいしょ)foreign driver’s license translation application form

2. 外国運転免許 (がいこくうんてんめんきょ)foreign driver’s license

3. 在留カード (ざいりゅうカード)residence card

4. 外国運転免許証翻訳文(がいこくうんてんめんきょしょうほんやくぶん)foreign driver’s license translation

5. 住民票(じゅうみんひょう)certificate of residence

6. 総合交通センター6(そうごうこうつうセンター)General Traffic Center

7. 運転技術試験(うんてんぎじゅつしけん)driving skill test

8. 視力検査 (しりょくけんさ) eyesight test

9. 自賠責保険 (じばいせきほけん) mandatory vehicle liability insurance

About the Author

Terry Dassow is a former Assistant Language Teacher with the JET Program who lived in Takasaki from 2011-2014. Upon returning to the USA, she taught writing at a Hmong high school before entering the editing field. She is currently an Editor and Communications Specialist for an engineering consulting and design-build firm based in Milwaukee, WI.